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Scaling a WOD
 
I’m fairly certain that everyone has scaled a workout at one time or another.  I am a fan of scaling. The majority of my WODs are done as a scaled variation. Why? Although I enjoy competing within the walls of ECC, I have no desire to compete in Regionals. I utilize our programming at ECC to increase General Physical Readiness (GPR). Maintaining a high level of readiness is essential for continued success in my role as a Strength Coach, my military service and for other interests like Jiu Jitsu.  
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When properly done, scaling will not only challenge all levels, but should also allow for continued improvement by selecting the safest progression when training with the desired outcome in mind. This includes safety, a skill to skill approach, the athletes ability and goals.  Let’s look at today’s WOD 
 
RX:
A: Front Squat 6x2 @ 80% of 1RM
B: Thrusters – 1-1-1-1-1-1
C: 7 Min AMRAP of:
20 Unbroken Double-Unders
What are some ways to scale this for athletes of varying skill levels with no underlining injuries?
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First, let’s define scaling. Scaling is the ability to safely manipulate any number of variables with the intent to provide a more individualized workout that is in sync with training age (skill level for each workout) as well as the athlete’s short and long term goals.
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Next, we will identify the variables. Some variables are sets, reps, % of 1 rep max (1RM) skill progression/regression and rounds and/or time.
Can you find any scaling options during this WOD?
 
Athlete 1:
Athlete 1 is a typical client with little to no prior Strength & Conditioning (S&C) training and less than 2 months training at ECC ( poor movement is identified as a lack of flexibility and  mobility, struggles with tight calves, hip flexors and lats).
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A: Front Squat: 10min of skill development 
B: Front Squat+ Push Press 3x5
Thruster 2x3 
A+B load/weight (#) used matches technique. 
C:7 Min AMRAP of:
20 DU/SU
30 sec Recovery
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The limiting factors for this athlete are mechanics and mobility. The athlete must utilize #s that allow for the best possible range of motion to improve current short comings in movement patterns. 
 
Athlete 2:
Athlete 2 has prior collegiate S&C experience with average mechanics. She graduated in May and vacationed w/limited training since her season ended in April. She has only been training at ECC for 6 weeks.
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A: Front Squat: 1x8, 1x6, 1x4, 1x2 
use # that is moderate 
B: Thrusters 3-3-2-1-1 
use the first three sets to build up. If teach/mech remain close to ideal utilize the last two sets and increase # accordingly
C: 7 Min AMRAP of:
20 DU (unbroken if proficient at DU)
30 sec Rec
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Essentially, we have tailored this workout to increase FS volume and intensity. During the thruster block, the athlete can work to identify a possible 1RM for a thruster if the standards are met in the FS block and the lighter loads in the early sets of the thruster. 
 
Review: 
 
RX:
A: Front Squat 6x2 @ 80% of 1RM
B: Thrusters – 1-1-1-1-1-1
C: 7 Min AMRAP of:
20 Unbroken Double-Unders
 
Athlete 1 scaling option:
A: Front Squat: 10min of skill development 
B: Front Squat+ Push Press 3x5
Thruster 2x3 
C:7 Min AMRAP of:
20 DU/SU
30 sec Recovery
 
Athlete 2 scaling option:
A: Front Squat: 1x8, 1x6, 1x4, 1x2 
B: Thrusters 3-3-2-1-1 
C: 7 Min AMRAP of:
20 DU (unbroken if proficient at DU)
30 sec Recovery
Results over time not over night
Lastly, there are many ways to safety scale a WOD. Athletes of all abilities can maximize long term success  by manipulating variables and mastering the basics while progressing to more advanced movement patterns. This should happen over time not over night. 
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Stop back for Wednesday's Blog. We will be taking a look at an upcoming WOD and you can test your scaling skills.
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Train Smart, Eat Clean, and PR Often
~Vin

 

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